cardiac-cath-lab-scatter-radiation-study

Lens Changes Associated With Radiation in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory

Here we take a look at TCT-198 Final Results of the IC-CATARACT (CATaracts Attributed to Radiation in the CaTh Lab) Study: Lens Changes Associated With Radiation in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

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TCT-198 Final Results of the IC-CATARACT (CATaracts Attributed to Radiation in the CaTh Lab) Study: Lens Changes Associated With Radiation in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory

 

 

Background

Radiation exposure can cause lens opacities. We examined the relationship between occupational exposure to ionizing radiation and the prevalence of lens changes in interventional cardiologists (ICs) and catheterization laboratory (“cath-lab”) staff.

 

Methods

A cross-sectional study at an interventional cardiology conference was conducted for 3 consecutive years (2016 to 2018). Study participants were asked to complete a questionnaire, collecting data pertaining to occupational exposure to radiation and potential confounders for the development of cataracts, followed by slit-lamp examination and grading of lens findings.

 

Results

A total of 188 individuals participated: 88% had occupational radiation exposure (age 49.5 ± 12 years; 81% men) and 12% were control subjects (age 37.6 ± 11 years; 64% men). In the exposed group, mean cumulative radiation dose to the lens was 4.79 Gy. The exposed participants group had a higher prevalence of Merriam-Focht (MF) ≥0.5 grade cortical and posterior subcapsular lens changes as compared with control subjects (58% vs. 27%; p = 0.006). The following factors were independently associated with lens changes: occupational radiation exposure (odds ratio [OR]: 5.11 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36 to 25.90]; p = 0.014); age (OR: 3.60 [95% CI: 1.60 to 8.53 for age 40 to 60 years]; p = 0.001; and OR: 21.50 [95% CI: 6.44 to 6.07]; p < 0.0001 for age >60 years), and female sex (OR: 3.47 [95% CI: 1.41 to 9.15]; p = 0.006). There was no difference between the prevalence of frank opacities in the 2 groups (24% vs. 9%; p = 0.094) (Figures A and B).

Figure1

 

Conclusion

ICs and cath-lab staff had a higher prevalence of lens changes compared with unexposed control subjects, highlighting the importance of minimizing staff radiation exposure.

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